Skopje for big-hearted

2 minutes to read

There are cities around the globe 'of a thousand lights', the ones that 'never sleeps' but one and only, city of solidarity. After the earthquake in 1963, Skopje was rebuilt in a short time just because of peoples good will from around the world! I am very proud today that this spirit of solidarity is still present in this beautiful city, especially when it is related to food: the Balkans have a very specific relationship with a food. Being hungry there is a shame for the host, not for the one who is hungry. There, food is considered as a human right as going to school and everyone's duty is for everyone to have it!

Last decades, somthing started to change, unfortunately, and people in Macedonia are facing more people in need of food. Almost three years ago, the initiative called 'Retweet a meal' decided to change this and while sharing homemade meals, young cook enthusiasts are advocating for a decent meal for everyone!

This initiative is represented by a weekly event. Every Saturday behind the Mother Theresa memorial house, people are gathering around noon. Some of them are hungry, some of them are willing to share their food. If you are visiting Skopje for the weekend, don’t forget to find people that are used to cook for this initiative and join food preparation for the day after. This initiative started and it is coordinating on social media, so you can contact people on the fb group Ретвитни оброк, or the hashtag #ретвитниоброк.

While I am writing about cool and human things in Skopje, I would like to mention one restaurant, Freshys. This restaurant is a regular contributor to a previously mentioned initiative, and 34% of the profit is donating to different causes. Don’t think twice where to have your lunch in Skopje!


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The author

Zlata Golaboska

Zlata Golaboska

I am Zlata and I am an architect living in the Balkans. I am passionate about cities, how people influence architecture and vice versa, and how places change our lives.

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