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Travel in time: Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raffaello

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Renaissance is the time that began in the late 14th century and continued until the 16th. This is a term that stands for development in any way. Reborn or Rinascita stands for the most fruitful period of the history of art and architecture. We're going to travel in time and we're going to Florence, where this time we'll be reflecting on the most brilliant artists of the Renaissance. All of these artists are somehow related to Florence. This is a magical spot and I will show you why. Let me present you Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raffaello. And no, they are not the Ninja Turtles. Not this time.

Donatello

Donatello, the oldest among all four, worked with extravagance and had demands for artistic freedom at times in which the relationship between the patron and the artist was determined by strict rules. Donatello's early work, the marble statue of David, was planned for the cathedral and ended up moving to the city hall in 1416, where it was used as a patriotic symbol. The sculpture lost part of its beauty somehow in the early 16th century, with the Michelangelo version of David. Donatello's David is today exposed in Palazzo del Bargello.

Leonardo

Leonardo was an Italian Renaissance architect, inventor, engineer, sculptor, painter. He was described as the ideal "Renaissance man" and as a universal genius. He is known for his masterpieces, such as The Secret Dinner and Mona Lisa. His inventions are now used in modern technology, even though, they were not applied back in his time. He helped in the development and evolution of the anatomy, astronomy, and construction. Some of his paintings are available to be seen in Uffizi. In Florence, you get to visit the museum dedicated to this iconic artist.

Michelangelo

Michelangelo Buonarroti was an Italian Renaissance sculptor, painter, architect and poet, and one of the most famous and influential artists in the history of European art. He was already considered the greatest artist of his time even during his lifetime, and since then he is said to be one of the greatest artists of all time. "Michelangelo's David" is his masterpiece from the Renaissance period between 1501 and 1504. This sculpture of marble, with a height of 5.17 m, depicts the biblical figure of David at the moment of thinking. The sculpture was originally set in front of today's Palazzo Vecchio (the old palace), the seat of the Florentine authorities. Today, there is a replica placed since 1910, while the original from 1873 is located in the Galleria dell'Accademia in Florence, where all the precious artwork is protected from damage.

Raffaello

Raffaello Sanzio is the indirect pupil of Leonardo and Michelangelo. Do you remember the Ninja Turtles where Ralph was led by Leo while Donny was more or less independent? He succeeded to incorporate most successfully all the techniques that his teachers were using. His art is lyrical and dramatic. He was the most representative painter of the Renaissance, who incorporated into his art all the previous knowledge and experience. Rafael had a "nomadic" lifestyle. He worked in various centers in Northern Italy, although he spent much of his time in Florence, perhaps in around 1504. However, even though he had his "Florentine period" in around 1504-08, he was never a permanent resident of Florence. Perhaps, first, he visited the city to provide materials for a workshop in Perugia, taking the opportunity to assimilate the influence of the Florentine art, while building at the same time his original style. In the Palatine Gallery at Pitti Palace, the stunning portraits of Agnolo Doni and Maddalena Doni and the Portrait of Tommaso Inghirami are being displayed.


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The author

Zlata Golaboska

Zlata Golaboska

I am Zlata and I am an architect living in the Balkans. I am passionate about cities, how people influence architecture and vice versa, and how places change our lives.

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