©Wikipedia/Schorle
©Wikipedia/Schorle

Visit the unique island of Fårö

2 minutes to read

Fårö is a small island situated a couple of miles off the coast of Gotland. Even though the ferry only takes a couple of minutes, Fårö is a world of its own with a unique and breathtakingly beautiful landscape, history and culture. Here is why you should visit it.

Discover Fårö's unique nature

Being so close to Gotland, Fårö is a perfect destination for a day trip. Take the ferry from Fårösund, in the northern part of Gotland. Both Gotland and Fårö are easily reached from Stockholm via airplane or a four-hour ferry.

Have you ever heard about the rauk fields of Fårö? The limestone rauks of Fårö are column-shaped landforms that often occur in groups. The rauks are usually created through wave erosion and are found in Sweden and Norway.  

 ©Flickr/Guillaume Baviere
©Flickr/Guillaume Baviere

Fårö has unique coastlines that partly consist of these rauk fields. Visit Langhammar to experience a wonder of nature and time. This is also one of the eight different nature reserves situated around the island. Fårö has also some amazing long sandy beaches. Visit, for example, Sudersand for a beach day or just a dip in the sea.

What to do on Fårö

You can rent bicycles and bike around the island, or a kayak or a paddleboat and discover the beauty of Fårö from the ocean. If you’re staying overnight or for a couple of days, there are several kinds of accommodations, such as camping fields, B&Bs, and hotels. 

The island has plenty of nice restaurants and cafes and quirky small shops where you can buy souvenirs and crafts. A must visit is the former unlicensed club Kutens Petrol. Today it is a fully legal music stage, as well as home to Crêperie Tati, Elsies café and Slow Train B&B and the island’s one and only bookshop.

Culture and history

Fårö became world known when the famous Swedish director, writer, and producer Ingmar Bergman made several of his movies on the island. If you admire his work, make sure to visit the newly built Bergman center. His work is also celebrated yearly through the so-called Bergman week, leading both Swedish and international filmmakers to visit Fårö.

©Wikipedia/Bengt Oberger
©Wikipedia/Bengt Oberger

Bergman is buried in the cemetery at the Church of Fårö. In addition to the grave's cultural value, the church also holds a historical significance due to the piece called “the Kuta-painting.” This work tells the tales of the seal hunters living in the region during the 17th century.

Even though the island is only 113 square kilometers, its uniqueness makes visitors return over and over again.


The author

Maria Lundin Osvalds

Maria Lundin Osvalds

I’m Maria, a 28-years old journalist, photographer and content creator from Sweden. I love adventures, being outdoor and living the nomadic life out of my van, as well as being in the city drinking coffee in a bohemian styled café or visiting local poetry slams.

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