The outstanding Piraiki

The outstanding Piraiki

2 minutes to read

One of the best things about living in a big city like Athens is that there is always a chance to find an area which you did not know anything about and then you visit it and it quickly becomes one of your favourite spots. This is what has happened to me and Piraiki, a neighbourhood in Pireo, on the south side of Athens. Pireo itself cannot be considered as a simple part of the city; it has its own history, structure, and stories as well as being for centuries, Athens’ main entrance, because here is where one of Europe’s largest port is located. Having all of these unique and exceptional characteristics it is not surprising to find a real hidden gem over here. And this is what Piraiki and the outstanding location are.

Picture © credits to Federico Spadoni
Picture © credits to Federico Spadoni

I have to admit it is not a piece of cake to get here if you are in the central Athens area: from Syntagma the fastest way (still, 1 hour) is to take bus n°040, get out at the Louka stop and then head to Akti Themistokleous street. From Omonia you can take metro line n°1 (green line) in the direction of Pireo, get out at the last stop, catch bus n°904, get out at Scholi Dokimon stop, and then again head to the boardwalk. A car or a scooter will cut in half the amount of time you’d need to get there but you’d have to drive around some maze-like streets and find a good parking spot which, usually, requires a kind of previous knowledge of the area. Anyway, whatever mean of transportation you’ll use, you’ll finally end up at the start of one of Athens’ most impressive streets (Akti Themistokleous) where you’ll enjoy a slow walk towards the port with the sea on one side and a set of stunning buildings, packed tavernas, and buzzing bars on the other one.

Picture © credits to Federico Spadoni
Picture © credits to Federico Spadoni

While waking up the street you’ll enjoy an incredible view of Athens’ shore: not only the port and the small marinas will show up in front of your eyes, but you’ll also be able to see the Glyfada and Voula neighborhoods around you. A really unique view which, I believe, is one of the few views that will allow you to understand how wide the city is and, consequently, how spread out its territory is. As you walk you’ll pass in front of a couple of really worth-the-wait classic Greek tavernas (Psaroskala Piraiki and O Faros) where ordering some seafood is obviously a must-do, as well as more modern bars offering a more international menu and a younger atmosphere. Forks and Corks is one of those, standing out with its well-thought out list of wines. The street finally leads to the Zea marina where again you’ll find several bars and cafes, slightly pricier than the average place. Anyway, the couple of extra euros are balanced out by the outstanding view from the marina crowned by the upper area of the neighborhood and by the feeling of having discovered a new favourite spot.    

Cover picture © credits to Federico Spadoni

The author

Federico Spadoni

Federico Spadoni

I am Federico, I was born and raised in Italy. Sport and news fanatic and active volunteer. I am currently living in Athens, Greece. I write about the central parts of Italy.

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