Sensing Belgrade: How to hear the city's heartbeat

1 minutes to read

Have you heard what the city whisper to you? It is a completely different communication level, trust me. Visiting Belgrade mostly means visiting Knez Mihailova.

It is the most famous central pedestrian district. This is the main reason why most of the street performers has reserved a place here. Walking from Terazije up until city library of Belgrade, you can hear many different instruments and music genres. Different quality too.

Trumpet orchestra, or a kid with violin who’s collecting money for music lessons, or powerful singer that don't need an instrument, or guitarists, or even pianist… you name it! You can all find them along this street. This is what you can hear during your visit to Belgrade, the street music. If you are curious about whole city atmosphere, check the other senses of the city: Tasting Belgrade, Smelling Belgrade, Sense of Touch in Belgrade, View of Belgrade.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DT5AGs7TGOk

Another aspect of the sound of Belgrade is what life here can compose. In this case, I would suggest youtubing’ some of the most popular Belgrade bands, as Belgrade stage is considered the most fruitful one on The Balkans. Belgrade people are very proud of EKV and there is a reason why. This band is one of the most successful and influential music acts coming out of former Yugoslavia. The band Katerina II built up their following massively after Milan Mladenović (the frontman) died in '94, which caused the band to dissolve. Three streets in the capital cities of former Yugoslav republics bear Mladenovic's name. One street in Belgrade, one street in Podgorica and since 2012, one street in Zagreb. The forecourt of the Belgrade Youth Center bears the name "Milan Mladenovic Place", and it is one of many Belgrade places where you can hear high-quality music if you decide to go to a concert.


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The author

Zlata Golaboska

Zlata Golaboska

I am Zlata and I am an architect living in the Balkans. I am passionate about cities, how people influence architecture and vice versa, and how places change our lives.

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