Don't die in Svalbard

Don't die in Svalbard

3 minutes to read

Located halfway between Norway and the North pole we have Svalbard. Santa's factories are thought to be here, in one of the northernmost settlements on earth. 2,310 people choose to live around Polar bears in the complete darkness they have during winter time. It doesn't become summer in Svalbard because the average temperature doesn't pass 9 degrees celcius. What makes this spectacular place an illegal place to die in?

More about Norway - the people of Narvik, eating habits, Norwegian rock museum, hiking in the south, and the Viking hike!

Photo ©: Sprok
Photo ©: Sprok

In Sellia, Italy, they have a solution that gives you higher taxes if you don't take good care of your body. They want to save the city from depopulation. In Svalbard, the citizens gets lower taxes.

Since 1950 a law has been in effect, saying that Svalbard shall be a place where death is not allowed. In the local cemetery, it was discovered that the bodies did not decompose. The bodies were kept from turning into skeletons because it was too cold here. When you put your body in a freezer, the body will remain whole because of the temperature. Same thing if you put your body in Svalbard. This is why you're requested to not fight the polar bears, as well.

Besides from the fascinating rules in Svalbard, the main reason to visit would be the eccentricities that the mainland Europe doesn't offer. Svalbard is far from the rest of the world, filled with multiple nationalities. Norwegians, Croatians, Russians, and many more. The ice bears are surrounding the place and so is the white fox. The mentality up here is happy and relaxed. Because of the small population of 2667, the place is communitarian and overall friendly and welcoming.

Longyearbyen, Svalbard Norway
Longyearbyen, Svalbard Norway
Longyearbyen, Svalbard and Jan Mayen

Why is this a problem?

Why can't bodies just remain frozen and maybe we can reincarnate them in the future? They have a fear of disease spreading and killing all the people on Svalbard. Therefore, they don't bury people in the graveyard. You can still bury your body in a pot that has burnt you to ashes. Svalbard residents choose not to do this very much. Scientists checked out corpses from 100 years ago and still found active viruses from the flu the people had from 1918!

Photo ©: Christopher Michel
Photo ©: Christopher Michel

You won't find any old people's institution for taking care of the elders. Their death is prepared for by being sent to the mainland of Norway to hang out in one of the many institutions that you find. On Svalbard, they don't have hospitals for giving  birth either, which makes things interesting. For birth giving, traumas and the like, you'll visit the mainland. The hospital had a wild party in 2017 because it was 100 years old then!

Svalbard Church
Svalbard Church
Postboks 533, Longyearbyen 9171, Svalbard and Jan Mayen

The church of Svalbard will be a location for everyone to visit. No matter who you are, you're invited to become saved in this church that has the architecture of Scandinavia and is constructed to survive the roughness that Svalbard has to offer.

Photo ©: Christopher Michel
Photo ©: Christopher Michel

If a huge meteor or the sun is doing something fancy, Svalbard is where you'll find scientists and astrology enthusiasts. Northern lights are the craziest here, too, because of the magnetism in the poles that is attracted to the north and the south pole.

Svalbard Museum
Svalbard Museum
Vei 231 - 1, Longyearbyen 9170, Svalbard and Jan Mayen

The museum of Svalbard is adventurous and visiting it might spark a sense of explorative thoughts in your head. You suddenly want to go further and visit the North pole because you see a special snowmobile that they used for an expedition. Exploring the Ghost city of Svalbard in the dark becomes interesting from a local tale you discover in the museum. The museum is thought out to entertain your senses in an unexpected way.

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The author

Kai Bonsaksen

Kai Bonsaksen

I'm Kai from Norway. I always follow that little voice in my head that tells me to go and explore new places … and on itinari, I talk about the ones I know the best!

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